Member Testimonials

We are standing at the crossroads. The pressure of the government on our profession is rising. Super clinics, Medicare Locals and the way the E-Health record is being rolled out are concerning examples.
Advances in technology offer a world of possibilities but create unprecedented challenges at the same time.Bureaucracy and red tape is rising to alarming heights. Our professional independence is at stake.That’s why I became a member of the AMA last year.I fully support the AMA in advancing our health system, and I admire the track record of the Association to protect our values and consequently, the health, wellbeing and privacy of our patients. I am delighted and honoured to be invited to the WA Council of General Practice and I will continue to support the COGP and the AMA as a whole, to achieve the best possible results for our profession.

Dr Edwin Kruys, General Practitioner

I was able to get a feel for how the AMA operates as an organisation and represents its members through my involvement with the AMA Doctors in Training committee as a fourth year medical student.

 

With the commencement of internship in 2013, the decision to become an AMA financial member was a simple one for me. Although the financial outlay seems relatively significant as a newly graduated doctor who is yet to receive a pay check, the AMA eased this burden through its intern payment options.I believe you are taking on a significant risk by not being a member of an organisation that does such a fantastic job acting as an advocate for its members on issues such as work place conditions and medico-legal matters. I also feel a sense of satisfaction in supporting an organisation that has such a significant ‘voice’, particularly on broader health issues that are of relevance to the entire general public.

 

I am happy to continue to support an organisation that advocates in the best interests of both patients in the community and also its members.

Dr Trent Little, RMO

I joined the AMA as a medical student at UWA and have been a member ever since. I believe it is important to be a member of your professional body, particularly one that is as influential as the AMA at the state and federal government level and within the patient and clinician communities.

 

Having  recently joinied the AMA (WA) Council, I have been impressed by the hard work and time being volunteered by many of the doctors involved at the committee level. I have witnessed first-hand the dedication of those involved, particularly our current President, Dr Richard Choong, in representing the medical community and advocating for the best interests of patients.

 

I’ve always believed you shouldn’t complain if you aren’t willing to take any action and you can’t improve things if you aren’t part of the solution. I’d encourage more doctors to join and get more active for the betterment of the profession.

Dr Marcus Tan, General Practitioner

As an intern, it was a natural progression to join as a fee-paying AMA member. I have been involved since that time as a member of the Doctors in Training Committee. Through this work, I have gained a better appreciation for the AMA DIT’s role as an advocate for junior doctor issues.

 

In particular over the last 12 months, the AMA DIT’s prompting of the crucial 4 Hour Rule Review has been of particular importance, with ongoing work towards improving the HCN service to junior doctors.

 

I will continue to support the organisation that supports our profession.

Dr Melita Cirilo, Registrar 

Want to share why you joined the AMA (WA)? Submit a testimonial on what inspired you to join, and it will be featured here or in the latest issue of Medicus

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Why I Joined the AMA (WA)...
"I joined the AMA for all the advocacy work that is done. It is great to be part of an organisation that supports and assists doctors in training in many aspects of their work."
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